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CEC is committed to creating a more resilient and just region in the face of climate change. Through our work with the Central Coast Climate Justice Network and elsewhere, our vision includes an end to racial injustices and their resulting environmental inequities.
Photo Courtesy Dennis Allen

Are New Homes in California Achieving Zero Net Energy?

California has received global attention for its goal of requiring all new homes to be zero net energy (ZNE) by 2020. A big component of achieving ZNE has been to sharply ratchet up energy-efficiency improvements in buildings. The challenge is turning out to be the glut of solar power during the afternoon but not enough renewable power after sundown to meet heavy evening demand. The crux is not having enough energy storage capacity. By CEC President's Council Member, Dennis Allen. This post originally appeared in the Santa Barbara Independent on August 7, 2020
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Go Solar Schools #gosolar

Schools across the country, and especially in California, are increasingly powered by solar energy. Thanks to declining solar costs, going solar often saves schools substantial money, allowing them to redirect these funds to educating students. Santa Barbara School District should be next, joining neighboring districts in Santa Maria and Oxnard that are powered by the sun. As one of the largest landowners in the region, going solar will also help the cities of Santa Barbara and Goleta reach their 100% renewable energy by 2030 goals.
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Solar Panels On House Roof

Updated Alert: Protect Rooftop Solar in California

Original Alert: Protect rooftop solar and net metering in California by signing this petition now.

Result: Over 130,000 people, 270+ of which were CEC followers, took action to protect rooftop solar in California. This overwhelming display of support marks the largest number of public comments ever recorded at the CPUC.

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Modern Day Money Trees

Ten years ago, Stephen had realized that he could either continue to pay his power company for increasingly expensive electricity, or he could invest in solar. Once he recouped his initial outlay on the investment, he reasoned, he could bask in free electricity for the duration of the panels’ life — between 30 and 40 years.
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